The 30 Best Family Board Games (2024): Cascadia, Labyrinth, Catan

There are so many family board games. Here are a few we also like.

Poetry for Neanderthals for $20: Every card has a word, and your seemingly simple task is to get your team to correctly guess it within the time limit by speaking in single syllables only. If you break the rules, the opposition can hit you with the inflatable “No” stick. Suitable for two to eight players aged seven years and up, it’s loud, silly, and usually makes everyone laugh.

Danger Danger for $15: Fast and frenetic, this simple card game for two teams is about trying to have high-scoring cards showing at the end of each round. There are no turns, you can cover the other team’s cards, and rounds are timed, but you must guess when the round will end. Super simple and very quick to play, this game can get chaotic.

That Escalated Quickly for $20: This game is quick, easy, and fun for up to eight players. Featuring scenarios, such as “I have invented a new sport, what is it?” players must provide suggestions from least dangerous (1) to most dangerous (10) based on their assigned number for each round. The leader of the round has to try and get them in the correct order. It works best with witty players who know each other well.

Kitchen Rush for $46: A truly unique title that proves too many cooks can spoil the broth; this game can get chaotic fast. You work together to cook dishes for customers within a strict time limit. It’s a little too complicated for young kids. (I’d say 10-years and up is best.) If you like this, try the videogame Overcooked.

Sounds Fishy for $20: Another fun group game from Big Potato, the challenge in Sounds Fishy is to spot fake answers. Each card poses a question, but only one of the answers you get is correct. It’s for four to 10 players, and we found it more fun but tougher with more people.

Zillionaires Road Trip USA for $12: Each of the 49 squares on the game board is a quirky roadside attraction, from Bubblegum Alley to the National Mustard Museum, and players bid to buy them with the aim of securing four in a row. My kids loved this, the adults not so much.

Cards Against Humanity: Family Edition for $29: You can play this party game with up to 30 players, and it will produce a fair bit of juvenile giggling and chortling. Like the adult version, there isn’t much strategy here, but finding the perfect combination to crack everyone up is satisfying.

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